Unintended Consequences

Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

In the rush to drill, baby, drill and frack every drop of shale oil from wells throughout America, we have managed to overlook a severe and disastrous consequence – water. According to a recent report in the Guardian, “It can take millions of gallons of fresh water to frack a single well, and much of the drilling is tightly concentrated in areas where water is in chronically short supply, or where there have been multi-year droughts.”

Oil wells currently just happen to be near areas that are already experiencing drought. California announced emergency water levels as of last week. Texas has been in drought for years. This does not take into account the needs of communities and farming, the two largest users of fresh water.

Of the nearly 40,000 oil and gas wells drilled since 2011, three-quarters were located in areas where water is scarce, and 55% were in areas experiencing drought, the report by the Ceres investor network found.

It seems obvious to most of us that these sort of consequences should be debated and realized before consent is given for drilling. But oil and gas companies fund their own studies and thenĀ  pay to rush permits and quicken the process, hoping science does not catch up before they have secured the ability to keep fracking over America.

Oil and water have never mixed.

Share
This entry was posted in Climate Change & Environmental Issues and tagged , , , on by .

About MNgranny

An activist since the age of 17, MNgranny embraced the Occupy Movement from its beginning. After earning a BA in Mass Communications and enjoying a 30 year career, she is now disabled and dedicates her life to changing the world for the next generation. Her experiences include volunteering in community service organizations and taking leadership roles throughout her academic and professional life. She is also a survivor of rape and domestic violence, a published author and a master naturalist. She has focused for the last several years on studying Middle East geopolitical impacts, and specializes in Kurdish history, culture and politics.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

Protected with IP Blacklist CloudIP Blacklist Cloud