Tag Archives: Fight for 15

Racial Justice Activist Erica Garner, Daughter of Eric Garner, Dies at Age 27

“She walked with a fierce dignity in this world and would not allow the powerful to get by with only words when the problems we face demand action.”

By Common Dreams. Published 12-30-2017

Photo: Cheeky

The official Twitter account of Erica Garner—the 27-year-old civil rights activist and daughter of Eric Garnerconfirmed that she passed away Saturday after being hospitalized following a heart attack.

The account is reportedly being operated by one of Erica’s co-workers, who has posted numerous updates about her condition as well as shared messages of support for her family and hope that she would recover. The confirmation of Erica’s death was followed by another message: Continue reading


‘Quiet No More’: Hundreds of Thousands Ready to Strike on May Day

‘The only way to take action against our rigged economy is by coming together and working to raise wages and working standards for all of us’

By Deirdre Fulton, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 4-30-2017

May Day strikes are planned nationwide, from rural communities to major cities. (Image: Design Action Collective)

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants and allies are expected to strike and protest on Monday, taking part in what organizers are hoping will be the largest national strike since the May Day demonstrations of 2006. 

“I definitely think this is going to be one of the biggest May Day marches,” Kent Wong, executive director of the UCLA Labor Center, told The Nation, which noted that “[t]he turbulent Trump era and draconian attacks on immigrant communities all but guarantee a bigger and more passionate turnout than usual this year.” Continue reading


McDonald’s Settlement Could Open Door for Worker Wins Nationwide

“The courageous workers who brought this suit forced one of the world’s most powerful companies to take responsibility for the way it treats us.”

By Lauren McCauley, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-31-2016

McDonald's workers strike for fair wages. (Photo: Steve Rhodes/cc/flickr)

McDonald’s workers strike for fair wages. (Photo: Steve Rhodes/cc/flickr)

Burger behemoth McDonald’s has reportedly reached a settlement with hundreds of franchise employees in California, which campaigners and attorneys are saying could be a precedent-setting development in the fight for fair wages.

In the settlement, revealed in a Friday filing in a U.S. district court in San Francisco, McDonald’s agreed to pay a total of $3.75 million in back pay and legal fees to roughly 800 employees of five restaurants owned by a single franchisee, Smith Family LP. Continue reading


Demanding ‘What We Need to Survive,’ Workers to Descend on McDonald’s Shareholders Meeting

Fast food giant also faces renewed calls to ditch controversial ‘McTeacher’s Nights’

By Andrea Germanos, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 5-25-2016

Fight for $15 protesters outside a Chicago McDonald's in 2013. (Photo: Steve Rhodes/flickr/cc)

Fight for $15 protesters outside a Chicago McDonald’s in 2013. (Photo: Steve Rhodes/flickr/cc)

As McDonald’s prepares to hold its annual meting on Thursday, low wage workers—buoyed by successes from the “unstoppable” Fight for $15 movement—are gearing up to confront the burger giant and again demand a decent wage and union rights.

On Wednesday, in addition to a mid-day strike at the flagship Rock N Roll McDonald’s in Chicago, organizers say thousands of underpaid workers will stage a protest at the company’s headquarters just outside the city, in Oak Brook, Illinois. Continue reading


This Legal Fight Could Lift Up Generations of Low-Wage Workers—And McDonald’s Is Not Happy

New York judge could determine whether fast-food giant can be held liable for any labor law violations by its franchisees

By Deirdre Fulton, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 3-10-2016

A fast-food worker strike last year in Minnesota. (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/flickr/cc)

A fast-food worker strike last year in Minnesota. (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/flickr/cc)

On the same day as Miami fast-food workers went on strike demanding higher wages and union rights, a trial began in New York that could have broad implications for the industry, pitting low-wage workers against burger giant McDonald’s.

The hearing before an administrative National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) judge maylast for weeks, according to the Washington Post.

It stands to “not only expose McDonald’s to massive liability, but also open the door for workers at McDonald’s franchises across the country to form a union that would negotiate directly with corporate headquarters, rather than each individual franchisee,” explained Post reporter Lydia DePillis. “And although the verdict will be specific to the Golden Arches, it likely will have a bearing on the rights of workers at thousands of other franchises as well.” Continue reading


Striking Fear Into Corporate Hearts, Labor Board Hands Big Win to Workers

‘Employers will no longer be able to shift responsibility for their workers and hide behind loopholes to prevent workers from organizing,’ say Teamsters

By Deirdre Fulton, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 8-27-2015

Why is Thursday’s ruling bad news for McDonald’s? “If a fast-food brand or a hotel chain can be deemed a ‘joint employer’ along with the smaller company, it can be dragged into labor disputes and negotiations that it conveniently wouldn’t have to worry about otherwise,” one journalist explained. (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/flickr/cc)

In what is being described as “one of the biggest labor decisions of the Obama administration,” the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) on Thursday expanded its “joint-employer” standard, paving the way for unions to organize on a much broader scale—and striking fear into the hearts of corporations that have used previous labor laws to shift workplace responsibilities elsewhere.

While the ruling dealt specifically with a California waste-management company, observers said its implications could go much further. “McDonald’s, Burger King and every other company that relies on a franchise business model just suffered the legal setback they’ve been fearing for years,” wrote Huffington Post labor reporter Dave Jamieson on Thursday afternoon.

Continue reading


‘We Will Win’: McDonald’s Worker Protests Stretch Into Second Day

At company’s annual shareholder meeting, activists deliver petition signed by 1.4 million Americans calling for higher pay

Written by Deirdre Fulton, staff writer for CommonDreams. Published 5-21-15.

Less than 24 hours after 5,000 workers marched on McDonald’s corporate headquarters in Oak Brook, Illinois, the fast food giant’s cooks and cashiers returned on Thursday morning to bring their call for $15 an hour and union rights directly to the company’s shareholders at their annual meeting.

Chanting “We believe that we will win” and “We want change and we don’t mean pennies,” an estimated 3,000 workers gathered for the second day of protests on Thursday. A handful of those worker-activists—wearing their company uniforms—were permitted through a barricade in order to deliver a petition, bearing 1.4 million signatures, that calls on McDonald’s to “pay your people enough to survive.” Continue reading


‘I Know We Will Win’: Largest Ever Low-Wage Worker Protest Sweeps United States

Day of action calling for a $15 minimum wage and the right to organize reached far beyond US borders

(Photo: fightfor15.org)

“Fast-food workers are joining together and standing up for what’s right, and with students, #BlackLivesMatter activists, adjunct professors, home care, Walmart, child care, and airport services workers standing with us, we are stronger than ever,” said Terrence Wise, fast food worker in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo: fightfor15.org)

Written by Sarah Lazare, staff writer for Common Dreams, published April 16, 2015.

In what is being called the largest low-wage worker protest the United States has ever seen, tens of thousands of fast food, laundry, home care, child care, retail, and education employees walked off the job or staged rallies on Wednesday in more than 200 cities across the country.

They were joined by workers in 35 countries on six continents, from New Zealand to Brazil to Japan.

The mobilization was part of the movement for a $15 dollar minimum wage in the U.S., which has touched off a nation-wide conversation about poverty and inequality since fast food workers began a series of rolling strikes and workplace actions more than three years ago. Continue reading