Tag Archives: Shell Oil

‘Watershed Moment for Climate Liability’ as Rhode Island Files Historic Lawsuit Against 21 Big Oil Companies

“Here we are—the smallest state, the Ocean State—taking on the biggest, most powerful corporate polluters in the world,” said the state’s attorney general. “They need to be held accountable.”

By Jessica Corbett, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 7-2-2018

In what advocates are calling a “watershed moment” for climate litigation, Rhode Island’s Democratic Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin announced on Monday that the state has filed a lawsuit against 21 major oil companies—including BP, Chevron, ExxonMobil, and Shell—”for knowingly contributing to climate change, and causing catastrophic consequences to Rhode Island, our economy, our communities, our residents, our ecosystems.”

“This lawsuit marks the first in the country filed on behalf of a state and its citizens against Big Oil,” Kilmartin declared. “For a very long time there has been this perception that they, Big Oil, were too big to take on, but here we are—the smallest state, the Ocean State—taking on the biggest, most powerful corporate polluters in the world, because it’s the right thing to do. They need to be held accountable.” Continue reading

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In First, Two Major Cities Sue Big Oil for Climate Crimes

San Francisco and Oakland charge that fossil fuel companies “stole a page from the Big Tobacco playbook” with misleading campaigns and should pay for damage from rising seas

By Jessica Corbett, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 9-21-2017

The Embarcadero at high tide. Photo: Heidi Nutters/flickr

Environmentalists are celebrating two new lawsuits filed by the cities of Oakland and San Francisco, California, in attempts to hold some of the world’s largest oil companies to account for fueling climate change.

“It’s time to hold these climate deadbeats accountable,” said Greenpeace’s climate liability campaigner Naomi Ages, after the suits were announced this week. Continue reading

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Climate Catches ‘Huge Break’ as Shell Calls It Quits in the Arctic

At least for the ‘foreseeable future,’ the oil giant will put a hold on its offshore drilling in Alaska after finding insufficient deposits

By Jon Queally, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 9-28-2015

In response to the announcement that Shell will cease drilling operations in the Arctic for the "foreseeable future," Greenpeace produced this image to offer their sentiments of farewell. (Image: Greenpeace/Twitter)

In response to the announcement that Shell will cease drilling operations in the Arctic for the “foreseeable future,” Greenpeace produced this image to offer their sentiments of farewell. (Image: Greenpeace/Twitter)

In what environmental campaigners are calling “a huge break” for the Arctic region and by extension the world’s climate, the Royal Dutch Shell oil company announced on Monday it would end exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea after disappointing results from its controversial operations in the Alaskan waters that took place this summer.

In a corporate press statement released Monday, the company said that its drilling vessel—located approximately 150 miles offshore and in about 150 feet of water—had “successfully” drilled an exploratory well to the depth of 6800 feet. Though the company claimed it “found indications of oil and gas,” it said the amount was “insufficient to warrant further exploration” and said the prospected site will now be “sealed and abandoned.” Continue reading

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Opposition Grows as Shell Drilling Fleet Heads to Arctic Waters

Obama administration expected to approve Shell’s Arctic drilling program as early as Wednesday

Written by Lauren McCauley, staff writer for CommonDreams, published March 24, 2015

A polar bear keeps close to her young along the Beaufort Sea coast in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (Susanne Miller/USFWS) Image via Wikimedia.

A polar bear keeps close to her young along the Beaufort Sea coast in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (Susanne Miller/USFWS) Image via Wikimedia.

Marking 26 years since the Exxon Valdez ran aground spilling as much as 38 million gallons of oil into the Port William Sound in Alaska, activists on Tuesday protested the Obama administration’s continued support for Arctic oil exploration.

Despite the known threat to the fragile Arctic ecosystem and high risk of a devastating oil spill, the Department of the Interior is expected as early as Wednesday to sign off on the revised environmental impact statement (EIS) for Shell’s Chuckchi Sea lease, which would clear a major hurdle for the company to restart its Arctic drilling program this summer. Continue reading

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Not in His Front Yard!

Photo from Occupy Wall Street, courtesy Osha Karow via Twitter

Photo from Occupy Wall Street, courtesy Osha Karow via Twitter

March 2, 2014: Approximately 1,000 activists rallied outside the White House in Washington DC to demonstrate their opposition to Keystone XL being approved. After hearing President Obama decry foreign governments for not allowing the voices of the people to be heard in front of their nation’s capital buildings, we watched as 398 of these protestors, on American soil, were arrested and hauled off by the busloads. It seems that protesting in front of our White House is only allowed if your protest is something supported by certain politicians, such as the Tea Party rallies we saw a few years ago. Or, perhaps it is because they protested in front of the United States White House, whose administration tells the international community how democratic we are by removing the protestors when they appear. We will hear the usual plausible excuses – blocking a sidewalk, affixing signs or themselves to the White House fence, and other reasons that make it “acceptable” to arrest peaceful protestors in Washington, DC.

Chelsea Clinton was the first to be arrested on 3-2-2014 in front of the White House while protesting approval of Keystone XL. Photo courtesy Anonymous, via YourAnonNews Twitter feed.

The first arrest on 3-2-2014 in front of the White House while protesting approval of Keystone XL. Photo courtesy Anonymous, via YourAnonNews Twitter feed.

On March 7, the window for making public comment on the possible approval of Keystone XL closes. Have you made your comment on “regulations.gov” to weigh in? The following are my comments, as posted on the site. There were only 8,147 comments at the time I posted mine. That is an incredibly small amount for the size of the population that will be affected if this project is approved. For more information on how to participate, see our Welcome page. If you have posted your public comment, we invite you to share your thoughts in a “Reply” below as well.

Dear President Barack Obama,

Hundreds of people zip tied to the White House fence and doing a die-in to protest Keystone XL. Photo from Jenna Pope, via Twitter

Hundreds of people zip tied to the White House fence and doing a die-in to protest Keystone XL.
Photo from Jenna Pope, via Twitter

The decision you are about to make regarding Keystone XL will make history – regardless of which side the final outcome favors. Please consider the following before making a decision that can not be withdrawn once implemented.

The proposed path of this pipeline crosses sacred land of indigenous people, who have pledged to lay their bodies on the ground to prevent this affront to their land, people, culture and lawful agreements that would be broken. What appears to us as worthless sand and rocks can not be disregarded simply because we wish to break yet another promise to the original American people.

In a recent speech, John Kerry stated that climate change is a top priority of the State Department. As such, we are just beginning to see severe weather, and conditions will worsen in the coming years. The path of this pipeline crosses tornado alley, runs along the edge of the world’s largest super volcano that is 40,000 years overdue for an eruption, and runs through land that is experiencing a huge surge in earthquakes that are growing in intensity and frequency. The proposed pipeline is not designed to withstand these possible disasters, nor would it withstand multiple conditions of any of these factors.

As was seen recently in Mayflower, Arkansas, the oil industry is still recalcitrant in managing spills and leaks. They have invested virtually nothing from their billions in profits to develop better disaster management and safety standards for existing or proposed pipelines. They are slow to react, deny the extent of damage, and attempt to shirk the expenses involved for the cleanup. Denial of landowner claims and refusal to release information to the public when spills occur are common place.

The studies conducted by ERM that the State Department says will be considered are invalid because they were conducted with gross conflict of interest. The State Department knew this and redacted the information in hopes the population would not find out that TransCanada, Koch Industries and Shell Oil hired the contractor to do the “study” that supports their efforts to get the project approved.

America is not a sewer line for the world’s filthiest oil. If Canada wants to ship this filth to the world markets, they should do so from their own shores, This entire controversy exists because even the Canadian people are not dumb enough to allow this pipeline to cross their land. Please do not give the international community yet another reason to think of us as “dumb Americans.”

Photo from Adam Greenberg, via Twitter

Photo from Adam Greenberg, via Twitter

Mr, President, you expressed deep alarm and concern over the protests and demonstration in Ukraine and now in Venezuela. Have you considered that you will see large mass protests on American soil if this pipeline is approved? How will those protesters be treated? Will they be met with the militarized police forces we saw attack the Occupy movement just two years ago? Mr. President, the whole world is watching.

Make history the right way, by choosing a sustainable, energy-efficient future for our country and our environment over the dangers presented in pursuit of profits by a huge international corporation. Once sold, this can not be bought back at any price.

As an ending note, and not included in my public comment, comes the question of how President Obama would react if it were Sasha and Malia being arrested in front of the White House. If it can happen to these young people, it can happen to them. And did this event get coverage by the main stream media? This is NOT what democracy looks like…

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