Tag Archives: US Army Corps of Engineers

Victory for Tribes, Waterways, and Planet as Pebble Mine Denied Permit

“Sometimes a project is so bad, so indefensible, that the politics fall to the wayside and we get the right decision.”

By Andrea Germanos, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 11-25-2020

Photo: Brandon Hill/NRDC

Environmental campaigners stressed the need for the incoming Biden White House to put in place permanent protections for Alaska’s Bristol Bay after the Trump administration on Wednesday denied a permit for the proposed Pebble Mine that threatened “lasting harm to this phenomenally productive ecosystem” and death to the area’s Indigenous culture.

Continue reading

Share Button

‘This Is Nightmarish’: Indigenous and Climate Leaders Outraged Over Minnesota Permits for Line 3 Pipeline

“Gov. Walz has apparently decided that if Washington won’t lead on climate, Minnesota won’t either.”

By Jessica Corbett, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 11-12-2020

Climate campaigners and Indigenous groups in Minnesota continue to fight against Enbridge’s Line 3 Pipeline. (Photo: Honor the Earth/Facebook)

Environmental and Indigenous leaders on Thursday responded with alarm after Minnesota regulators approved key permits for Enbridge Energy’s planned Line 3 Pipeline replacement, and called on Democratic Gov. Tim Walz to block any construction for the Canadian company’s long-delayed multibillion-dollar project.

“Gov. Walz has apparently decided that if Washington won’t lead on climate, Minnesota won’t either,” said Andy Pearson, MN350’s Midwest tar sands coordinator, in a statement about the permits. “Make no mistake. “This decision is a sharp escalation against water protectors and climate science.” Continue reading

Share Button

Following Trump’s “Utterly Alarming” DAPL Order Would Violate Law, Tribe Warns

“[T]he law requires that changes in agency positions be backed by new circumstances or new evidence, not simply by the president’s whim.”

By Nadia Prupis, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 1-26-2017

“Millions stand by us, and will continue to do so as we receive executive indication that infrastructure projects will be driven by corporate desire rather than American values,” Standing Rock Sioux chairman David Archambault III wrote in a letter to President Donald Trump. (Photo: Peg Hunter/flickr/cc)

The Standing Rock Sioux has responded to President Donald Trump’s executive order to push through the long-contested Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), calling the memorandum “utterly alarming” and warning that following through with it would violate federal law.

In a letter to President Donald Trump on Thursday, Standing Rock Sioux chairman David Archambault III noted that Trump did not accept a request to meet with him, and issued the order “without any consultation.” Continue reading

Share Button

Standing Rock Braces for Trump Order Approving DAPL — Could Come Today

As the Standing Rock Sioux tribe votes to forcibly evacuate all the remaining camps, President Donald Trump may be preparing to approve the Dakota Access Pipeline.

By Derrick Broze. Published 1-23-2017 by The Anti-Media

Photo: Sacred Stone Camp/Facebook

Cannonball, ND — President Trump has officially begun his first week in office. As the nation waits to see what executive orders Trump will issue and which promises he will keep, the Standing Rock Sioux are anxiously anticipating a decision from the new president regarding the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. According to one congressman, there may be cause for opponents of the DAPL to be concerned.

Only hours after Trump’s inauguration, Kevin Cramer, a Republican congressman from North Dakota, appeared on the Rob Port Show on 970 AM. During the interview, Cramer said Trump will be rescinding a recent call for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and granting approval for the final leg of the pipeline under Lake Oahe. “By next week the EIS will be rescinded,” Cramer told Port. Continue reading

Share Button

Dakota Access Pipeline Permit Denied

‘For the first time in Native American history, they heard our voices.’

By Nika Knight, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 12-4-2016

The water protectors have been battling the pipeline construction for months. (Photo: Joe Brusky/Overpass Light Brigade/flickr/cc)

The water protectors have been battling the pipeline construction for months. (Photo: Joe Brusky/Overpass Light Brigade/flickr/cc)

In a long-awaited victory for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline, tribal leadership announced late Sunday.

The agency will not allow the pipeline to be built under Lake Oahe, a reservoir near the tribal reservation, without a full environmental impact assessment that examines alternative routes for the pipeline. Continue reading

Share Button

US Government invalidates position in desperation to evict Standing Rock protestors

Pitted against 3 government agencies, the water protectors at Standing Rock brace for even harsher treatment

Written by Carol Benedict

Photo: @zap seattle/Twitter

Photo: @zap seattle/Twitter

There are three separate agencies involved in the stand-off at Standing Rock. Each of these agencies has mounted their own defenses to try to force the completion of a pipe line that does not have the full permitting and authorization required by law. Energy Transfer Partners and Dakota Access Pipe Line are both operating against a direct order of President Obama’s to stop within 20 miles of the lake and have stated they do not intend to stop until this pipeline is completed.

Earlier in the controversy, DAPL hired private security forces from outside the state of North Dakota. They arrived with attack dogs and other means of attacking the protesters, but had no permits or authorization within the state. DAPL allowed them to operate anyway, deciding that they could operate outside the law.

On November 25, the US Army Corps of Engineers sent a letter to the tribes at Sacred Stone Camp, informing them that as of December 5, their presence would be subject to prosecution. The reasons behind this decision was the escalating violence at the action site, even though the violence is coming only from the law enforcement authorities.

The US government has maintained that the land in question is federal land: public land they are authorized to control under their jurisdiction.

The water protectors believe this same spot of land was granted them in an 1851 treaty and they have never ceded that land.

Morton County officials have also sought the assistance from the US Border Patrol (a branch of the Department of Homeland Security) in the militarized police presence at the Standing Rock encampments. To date, the tactics used against the protesters include water cannons, grenades, rubber bullets and other means of crowd control usually deployed in urban settings. Their actions have caused enough concern that the United Nations is now investigating these actions as human rights violations.

Morton County and the state of North Dakota have effectively removed all arguments from the Army Corps of Engineers claim of federal land by involving the US Border Patrol.

US Border Control can only be activated within 100 miles of what is recognized as a border to another country or sovereign nation. By involving Border Patrol, the state and county are both officially recognizing the sovereignty rights of the water protectors, yet feel empowered to evict them from their own land under this premise.

In order for supporters to come to the Sacred Stone encampments, they must agree to bringing no weapons, alcohol or drugs of any kind. The camp, now at over 400 people, lives in prayer and peace with conversations between tribes, between generations and between indigenous and non-indigenous people. These are Americans, who believe they have as much a right to clean water and land rights as you and I.

Think about it.

Share Button