Monthly Archives: October 2016

NYPD Catches Itself Selling Stolen Goods, Blames Business Owner

By Carey Wedler. Published 10-8-2016 by The Anti-Media

One Police Plaza- NYPD headquarters. Photo: Youngking11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

One Police Plaza- NYPD headquarters. Photo: Youngking11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

New York, NY — A business owner in Manhattan is suing the city after being forced to waive his fourth amendment rights and potentially forfeit his business because an NYPD officer sold illegal goods at his store.

You read that right.According to a lawsuit filed this month by the Institute for Justice, a libertarian legal advocacy group, an undercover NYPD detective attempted to sell stolen electronics to customers at Sung Cho’s laundromat in Inwood, which located near the northern tip of Manhattan, in 2013. After the officer successfully sold stolen goods to two people — one inside the store and one outside — the city threatened Cho with eviction “merely because a ‘stolen property’ offense had happened at his business,” the legal organization’s website explained. Continue reading

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#NoDAPL: Native American Leaders Vow to Stay All Winter, File Lawsuit Against Police

Amnesty International are sending a delegation of human rights observers to monitor the response of law enforcement to the protests.

By Common Dreams staff. Published 10-29-2016 by Common Dreams

Native American leaders vowed on Saturday to protest through the winter against a North Dakota oil pipeline they say threatens water resources and sacred lands and are planning lawsuits over police treatment of arrested protesters.

Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II said he and other tribal leaders were working on providing food, heat and shelter for protesters opposed to the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline.

“We’re just working through some technical details as far as where the land is, and the type of land that can be used for some permanent structures,” Archambault told reporters in Mandan, North Dakota on Saturday morning. Continue reading

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FCC Passes Sweeping Internet Privacy Rules in ‘Big Win for Civil Rights’

New rules require internet service providers to get customers’ explicit consent before sharing data with third parties

By Nadia Prupis, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-27-2016

The rules require Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to get customers' explicit consent before using or sharing behavioral data like browsing history, location, and other sensitive information. (Photo: Blogtrepreneur/flickr/cc)

The rules require Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to get customers’ explicit consent before using or sharing behavioral data like browsing history, location, and other sensitive information. (Photo: Blogtrepreneur/flickr/cc)

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Thursday passed sweeping new privacy rules designed to keep broadband providers from giving customers’ private data to third parties.

The rules, approved by a vote of 3-2, require Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to get customers’ explicit consent before using or sharing behavioral data like browsing history, location, and other sensitive information with marketing firms or other companies, the Washington Post reports.

“It’s the consumers’ information,” FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said. “How it is used should be the consumers’ choice. Not the choice of some corporate algorithm.” Continue reading

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As CETA Rises from Ashes, Campaigners Vow: ‘The More You Insist, the More We Resist’

Belgium delegates reached 11th-hour consensus, which grants the Court of Justice of the European Union the ability to rule on final inclusion of ISDS

By Lauren McCauley, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-27-2016

Campaigners protested the Canada-European Union trade agreement outside the European Commission on Thursday. (Photo via Corporate Europe/Twitter)

Campaigners protested the Canada-European Union trade agreement outside the European Commission on Thursday. (Photo via Corporate Europe/Twitter)

The controversial Canada-European Union trade agreement that many declared “dead” now appears to be rising from the ashes, as officials announced Thursday that they have reached a last-minute consensus.

Earlier this week, trade delegates from the Belgian region of Wallonia rejected the Comprehensive Economic & Trade Agreement (CETA) out of concern that certain provisions, particularly the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) system, inflate the power of multinational corporations and undermine standards protecting labor, the environment, and consumers. Continue reading

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Amidst Law Enforcement Crackdown, DAPL Company Warns Water Protectors: Get Out, Or Else

‘Militarized’ police forces have taken steps ‘to escalate tensions and promote fear’

By Andrea Germanos, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-26-2016

Demonstrators hold signs during a protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline in Minneapolis, Minnesota on October 25, 2016. (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/flickr/cc)

Demonstrators hold signs during a protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline in Minneapolis, Minnesota on October 25, 2016. (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/flickr/cc)

To the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies who stepped up their resistance this weekend with a new protest camp reclaimed through eminent domain, Dakota Access Pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners has a stern message: get out or face prosecution.

Protesters can leave the property, the company stated Tuesday, according to the Associated Press. “Alternatively and in coordination with local law enforcement and county/state officials, all trespassers will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and removed from the land.” Continue reading

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‘Terrifying’: AT&T Spying on Americans for Profit, New Documents Reveal

‘If companies are allowed to operate in this manner without repercussions, our democracy has no future’

By Nadia Prupis, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-25-2016

Project Hemisphere allowed agencies to conduct warrantless searches of trillions of call records and other cellular data—such as "where a target is located, with whom he speaks, and potentially why." (Photo: Har Gobind Singh Khalsa/flickr/cc)

Project Hemisphere allowed agencies to conduct warrantless searches of trillions of call records and other cellular data—such as “where a target is located, with whom he speaks, and potentially why.” (Photo: Har Gobind Singh Khalsa/flickr/cc)

Telecommunications giant AT&T is spying on Americans for profit and helped law enforcement agencies investigate everything from the so-called war on drugs to Medicaid fraud—all at taxpayers’ expense, according to new reporting by The Daily Beast.

The program, known as Project Hemisphere, allowed state and local agencies to conduct warrantless searches of trillions of call records and other cellular data—such as “where a target is located, with whom he speaks, and potentially why”—for a massive range of investigations, the Beast‘s Kenneth Lipp reports. In one case examined by the news outlet, a sheriff’s office in Victorville, California used Hemisphere to track down a homicide suspect. Continue reading

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Tom Hayden, ‘One of the Great 20th Century Activist Leaders,’ Dies at 76

A nation mourns a figure, described by many as ‘a leading advocate for a more just and equal society’

By Lauren McCauley, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-24-2016

Tom Hayden at the LBJ Library 2016. Photo: Godwin [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Tom Hayden at the LBJ Library 2016. Photo: Godwin [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Progressive icon and anti-war activist turned California lawmaker Tom Hayden passed on Sunday at the age of 76.

Hayden dedicated his life to peace, social justice, and activism: from the 1960s, when he helped found the New Left and worked to organize black southern sharecroppers, to building—alongside his former wife, actress Jane Fonda—a California political machine that for decades advanced progressive candidates and measures. Continue reading

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‘Stakes Are Getting Higher’: 83 People Arrested, Maced in North Dakota

Saturday’s arrests follow reports of escalating police abuse at the protest sites, including beatings and unnecessary strip-searches of those arrested

By Nadia Prupis, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-23-2016

Photo: Nic Waller/Twitter

Photo: Nic Waller/Twitter

More than 80 people were arrested in North Dakota on Saturday, as police armed with pepper spray descended on a protest near the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) construction site.

The 83 water protectors were hit with charges ranging from rioting to criminal trespass, according to the Morton County sheriff’s department. The Bismarck Tribune reported: Continue reading

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Unbelievable: Media Cited Terrorist Leader to Claim No Terrorists Are in Aleppo

By Darius Shahtahmasebi. Published 10-21-2016 by The Anti-Media

Photo: @IngeZondag/Twitter

Photo: Inge Zondag/Twitter

On Wednesday, the Guardian released an article titled “U.S. and U.K. reject Russian offer of ‘pause’ in airstrikes on Syria.” Aside from the fact it’s riddled with the outlet’s usual pro-U.S.-U.K. and anti-Russian propaganda, the article sank to the lowest of possible lows in an attempt to present the Russian military as an aggressor in Aleppo in which there are allegedly no terrorist groups — only moderate fighting forces.

How? By citing the leader of a terrorist group. Continue reading

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UN Expert Decries Global Assault on Freedom of Expression

The findings reveal ‘how policies and laws against terrorism and other criminal activity risk unnecessarily undermining the media, critical voices, and activists’

By Andrea Germanos, staff writer for Common Dreams. Published 10-21-2016

"Censorship in all its forms reflects official fear of ideas and information," said U.N. Special Rapporteur on the freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye. (Photo: Rachel Hinman/flickr/cc)

“Censorship in all its forms reflects official fear of ideas and information,” said U.N. Special Rapporteur on the freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye. (Photo: Rachel Hinman/flickr/cc)

“Governments are treating words as weapons,” a United Nations expert has warned, previewing a report on the global attack on the freedom of expression.

The report, based on communications with governments stemming from allegations of human rights law violations—reveal “sobering” trends of threats worldwide and “how policies and laws against terrorism and other criminal activity risk unnecessarily undermining the media, critical voices, and activists.” Continue reading

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